ARE FRENCH BULLDOGS AGGRESSIVE?

To start with, French bulldogs are like any other breed that you know, and generally, dogs can be aggressive - a French bulldog is no different.  Think about it this way, one of the reasons dogs were domesticated by men is to help protect them and their property. So, even though French bulldogs can be aggressive, they are usually not aggressive. Take a Pit Bull for example, it is believed to be aggressive but a Pit Bull is not usually aggressive unless it is trained to be. Don't forget, French Bulldogs belong to the Bulldog breed of dogs, what this means is that French Bulldogs are big dogs in a small body. On the brighter side, French bulldogs are usually sweet, playful, clownish, very smart,and well-behaved too. They are usually very attached to their and never likes to be left alone, for too long a time.

From our experience with French Bulldogs, French bulldogs get along with each other in most conditions, but they are also known to show some level of aggression towards dogs of the same sex. This can happen in a number of conditions;

  1. If they are provoked
  2. If they become jealous, or
  • If they are threatened

What do French Bulldogs do when they are provoked, get jealous or threatened?

When that happens, French Bulldogs aggression is usually expressed through barking and growling. French bulldogs physically attacking other pets or animals are rare, such can completely be prevented if you put both animals together at a very young age, so that they grow together.

French Bulldogs are friendly with other pets and children

There are instances where French bulldogs have been seen playing with cats of the same owner they live in the same house, they sleep and eat together, without one being aggressive towards the other. Interestingly also, French Bulldogs love children, too. Therefore, little cute Frenchie can literally get along with anyone or animal in the same house without any problems.

No one can predict what a puppy Frenchie can be like when it grows up

If you are wondering what your puppy can be like when it grows up? You have to note, 'there's no straight answer to it', and the reason is that no one can actually predict the attitude of a puppy when it grows up no matter how long an experience the person has had in the breeding business. And, this inability to predict whether a puppy Frenchie will be aggressive or not when it grows is not peculiar to the dog family, it is also the same in humans, can you predict what a child's temper will be like when they are just a few months old? The best thing to do if you are very concerned about this is to get an adult French Bulldog.

Sex doesn’t matter, Neuter your Frenchie if you want to prevent bad temper and aggressive outburst

Whether you are getting a puppy Frechie or an adult one, don't be deluded by the sex of the dog; whether the dog is a male or female has nothing to do with their tendencies to be disobedient, stubborn, or even aggressive. Some breeder have expressed that in their kennels, female Frenchies are troublesome, while the males are sweet and kind, and that the female Frenchie can also be moodier or feistier, whereas to some other breeders, their experiences are the other way round. Neuter them, if you want to prevent bad temper and aggressive outburst, it makes them easier to handle, that's what some breeders do.

French Bulldogs can get bossy, it is not a sign of aggression, learn to control it early

It's kindof funny, you may notice as you live with French Bulldogs that some of them like to think that they are the boss in the house, that's kinda cute and charming, I think. That mindset of some Frenchies is actually because of their attention-seeking nature, because they want to be looked after every single time, they tend to think like that. Some see this as being territorial around their owner. Truth is, they like to see another take that position from them. Again, it is not peculiar to Bulldogs, literally every dog have such moments in their lives. They growl when another dog comes and you want to cuddle that one instead of them.

Don't mistake that as a sign that they want to fight or be aggressive, it is simply a way to complain to you, and telling the other dog to keep away. Really a very funny behavior, I think, but you shouldn't reward such because, lest he'll get used to it and you may not like it sometimes.

Therefore, you have to let your Frenchie know that it is not acceptable to behave like that. Furthermore, while yourFrenchie is yet young, make efforts to teach him that you are the boss in the house and not him, as you probably know, bad behaviors are difficult to correct when one grows up.

That's about it, always remember that every dog have their uniqueness, and individual personality, just like human beings, so it’s better to approach your Frenchie with that mindset and not extremely assume any general behavior. Moreover, you should be the leader, hence, as the human, you are the alpha. Typically, French Bulldogs are perfect pets; they are loyal, they very playful, and very loving too, so, you'll most likely have no trouble keeping them under control. Do you think that French bulldogs are aggressive, unlike what we believe? Comment below.

5 comments

  • JOe

    My frenchie is agrresive to other dogs, she want for the first 2 years though, she grew up with another dog but would often attack (including biting) if she wanted a toy/ treat. She always wanted both treats!
    Since my other (very passive) dog died she’s got worse. We’ve never punished her, we have tried positive rewards for her being around other dogs, but we sadly just can’t trust her entirely. She just turns on a sixpence. She was attacked by a Jack Russel (her fault, treat related in her early years) and since then she has gotten worse. She has even attacked a dog on a walk after running towards it. She is now walked on a lead at all times. We’ve had behaviourists in but I just am not willing to text her out on someone else’s dog.
    We love her more than life itself, she has never been afgtresolve to us, others and she loves children. But i would never completely trust her. Which is sad. I’ve had dogs all my life, including several German Shepard’s. I fully understand a. Dogs loyalty and temperament and behaviour, and know this can change over time (if in pain for example)
    I used to think, there’s no such thing as a bad dog, but only a bad owner, but I have tried everything over the last 6 years- thing is with French bulldogs… they’re bulldogs!! They have terrier in them. Sometimes it very much is the breed and the inherent nature can be aggressive.


  • FGarza

    I got my frenchie when when he was 4 year old the breeder told me he was very friendly with children but after having him at home for a few weeks he got very aggressive with my 6 year old and bit her face, a few weeks later he bit her again on her nose. He doesn’t show aggression with teenagers and adults but he doesn’t seem to like children. I’ve tried to teach my dog that it’s not ok to be aggressive and he has gotten better but there is sometimes when he still shows aggression towards my 6 year old.


  • Emoke De kun

    We just rescued a Frenchie who was in cage her whole life . We think she has no socialization skills. She gets along with m6 other Frenchie . She has some aggression towards my cats. I am worried she will hurt them . My other Frenchie gets along with one cat and is tolerated by other cat. Any advice .


  • AJ

    I have an 8 month old Female out of nowhere she has become aggressive and stays up all night I have tried everything and nothing works i don’t know what else to do if anyone has any suggestions please feel free to let me know


  • Bob

    Almost completely opposite of this article: We have a 14 month old Frenchie and she has aggression issues. She is aggressive to dogs she has been raised with (they are older, but she’s been with them since 8-weeks); she barks constantly, and she does not truly like to be petted. She does like to be in my wife’s lap (mostly for warmth, I think, rather than to be cuddled). She is quite playful and curious, but her playing will almost certainly involve teeth. She is not a licker; but a biter — not in a mean attacking way, but she can’t play without biting at your hands or our other dogs faces — even when you have a toy.

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